Friday, 14 August 2015

Macchi C.205 'Veltro' - (1:48 Tauro Model) Part 3


Detailing the Engine


Historical Background

The Macchi C.205 featured a licence-built version of the German Daimler Benz DB 605 liquid cooled, supercharged inverted V-12 engine.  These were built by Fiat and designated as the RA.1050 R C.58 Tifone (Typhoon).  This aircraft was one of the three Italian "Series 5" fighters that were built around this engine, the other two being the Reggiane Re.2005 and the Fiat G.55.

The Model

As hinted previously in this build, the engine in the kit has some nice detail and features a separate supercharger/compressor assembly, separate exhaust outlets as well as various ancillaries.  Ever since I got this kit I knew I would be displaying it with the engine exposed and a lot of it will be visible.  I therefore decided to add some further detail to enhance the final look.

Starting from the top, the first area to receive treatment was the crank case cover.  Reference photos of the real engine clearly show an array of very evident bolts that fasten this cover to the engine block.  My first attempt was to glue thin plastic strips onto the cover and using a sharp blade I cut out the 'bolts'.
Fashioning the bolts out of plastic strips
As you can see from the image above, this resulted in a quite untidy look with unevenly spaced and sized bolts.  In short I was not happy with the result so I switched to plan-B.

Plan-B consisted of fashioning a new crank case cover from aluminium and applying a neat trick I picked up from my good friend Brian Cauchi.  I first marked out where the bolts would go using a fine pencil, then, using a blunt point, I started to make small depressions in the aluminium.  The trick is to do this over a 'soft' surface like a cutting mat.

Adding the bolts
The following picture shows the end result when the aluminium is turned the right way-up.

The finished crank case cover showing the raised 'bolts'

To fix the new crank case cover to the engine I obviously had to shave off the existing detail which was then re-done from bits of scrap plastic sprue.  There are a couple of more details to add to this area but they can be applied after painting.


From here I turned my attention to the underside of the engine, specifically the air compressor and reduction gear-box:

Adding plumbing to the underside of the engine (apologies for poor quality)
The air compressor will be mostly hidden when the engine is installed, however it could still do with a little modification to make it appear closer to the real thing.

A section of the air compressor tubing is cut off...

... and replaced with thinner plastic rod

Next in the list were the spark plug leads.  I had already added the ends of these using thin copper wire however I decided to retro-fit some further detail.  I bent the wires back to scrape off the molded detail and proceeded with adding my own:

Starboard side showing the new leads...

... and the port side receives similar treatment


That's it for now.  In the next post I will tackle the back of the engine vis-a-vis connections to the firewall.

No comments:

Post a Comment